Quickstart

This quickstart guide will help you to run a Cryptokernel node with the reference coin K320. First we will download and install the Cryptokernel software, synchronise with the blockchain, create a new K320 receiving address and configure mining in order to aquire some coins. You can use these coins to further explore Cryptokernel.

Download and install

Visit the downloads page in order to download the latest Cryptokernel release for your platform. At present 64-bit Windows, MacOS and Linux binaries are provided. It is also possible to build Cryptokernel from the source code. Once you have downloaded the archive for your platform, extract its contents to a location of your choice.

Opening the terminal

ckd is the reference Cryptokernel daemon that contains everything you need to run a K320 node and start using Cryptokernel. ckd is a command-line application so you will need to open a terminal window in order to begin.

Linux

The method for accessing the terminal depends on your specific Linux distribution. On Ubuntu Desktop it can be accessed by searching for “Terminal” in the menu bar. Once you have a terminal open, change directory to the location where you extracted Cryptokernel.

e.g.

~$ cd /home/james/cryptokernel

Windows

The terminal on Windows is called the command prompt. This can be found from the Start menu or by pressing the windows key and R, then typing cmd at the “Run” window and pressing okay. From the command prompt you will need to change location to where you extracted Cryptokernel.

e.g.

C:\Users\James> dir C:\Users\James\cryptokernel

C:\Users\James\cryptokernel>

MacOS

The terminal in MacOS can be found from Finder in Applications->Utilities->Terminal. Once you have a terminal open, change directory to the location where you extracted Cryptokernel.

e.g.

~$ cd /Users/James/cryptokernel

Running ckd

The remainder of this guide will continue using the Linux/MacOS convention of starting ckd by typing:

~$ ./ckd

Windows users will instead have to write the following (without the ./) to achieve the same thing:

C:\Users\James\cryptokernel> ckd

First run

As described above, start ckd in order to create a new K320 wallet. ckd will ask you to choose a password for your wallet.

e.g.

~$ ./ckd
Enter new wallet passphrase (min 8 chars): ********
Confirm passphrase: ********
Wallet successfully encrypted
ck daemon started

Querying information about our node

Now open a second terminal window and change directory to the location where you extracted Cryptokernel as in the opening the terminal section above. From there, you can interact with the ckd instance you just started. First off you can use the getinfo command to retreive the current status of your node.

e.g.

~$ ./ckd getinfo
{
	"balance" : "0.00000000",
	"ck_version" : "0.1.1-alpha",
	"connections" : 0,
	"height" : 1,
	"mempool" : 
	{
		"count" : 0,
		"size" : "0.000 MB"
	},
	"rpc_version" : "0.0.2"
}

It typically takes a few hours for ckd to syncronise the entire K320 blockchain. The connections field in the getinfo output tells you how many other Cryptokernel peers you are connected to. Once ckd has found some peers, it will begin downloading and verifying blocks and the height field will increase accordingly to indicate how many blocks are in the blockchain.

Querying information about other nodes

You can use getpeerinfo to retrieve information about the peers you are connected to. Part of this readout tells you the heights of other peers, which can be useful to determine if you are fully syncronised with the K320 network.

e.g.

~$ ./ckd getpeerinfo
{
	"108.20.219.131" : 
	{
		"connectedSince" : 1534358423,
		"height" : 207062,
		"incoming" : false,
		"ping" : 18,
		"transferDown" : 92082,
		"transferUp" : 22222,
		"version" : "0.1.1-alpha"
	},
	"13.58.67.108" : 
	{
		"connectedSince" : 1534358426,
		"height" : 207062,
		"incoming" : false,
		"ping" : 44,
		"transferDown" : 33721,
		"transferUp" : 23843,
		"version" : "0.1.1-alpha"
	},
	"159.65.161.209" : 
	{
		"connectedSince" : 1534358429,
		"height" : 207062,
		"incoming" : false,
		"ping" : 9,
		"transferDown" : 25625,
		"transferUp" : 13736,
		"version" : "0.1.0-alpha-rc4"
	},
	"18.85.22.252" : 
	{
		"connectedSince" : 1534358414,
		"height" : 207062,
		"incoming" : false,
		"ping" : 4,
		"transferDown" : 31122,
		"transferUp" : 19799,
		"version" : "0.1.0-alpha-rc4"
	}
}

Stopping ckd

You can stop the ckd instance by using stop.

e.g.

~$ ./ckd stop

Running ckd in the background

To start ckd in daemon mode, use the -daemon flag. This will cause ckd to run in the background, allowing you to close the terminal window.

e.g.

~$ ./ckd -daemon
ck daemon started
~$

Retrieving a wallet address

In order to receive coins from mining or from other users you will need to generate a new wallet address. Cryptokernel stores addresses as labeled accounts with distinct balances to help you easily organise your funds. To create a new account or view the balance and address for an existing account, use the account command and provide an account name of your choosing.

e.g.

~$ ./ckd account mining_rewards
Please enter your wallet passphrase: ********
{
	"balance" : "0",
	"keys" : 
	[
		{
			"privKey" : 
			{
				"cipherText" : "qtWvIRW3E9wHDclGPZ4GTjAolBjVT8Dpe4st8SUzBahv7oE8SpQ9eeUlNtjpRLLZ",
				"iv" : "0/GiyAoK3D0OvozHALGK7g==",
				"salt" : "MJOLKLDeQWVZpU8TQ0+eruKbov3Ub+gB16KDU5lelD0="
			},
			"pubKey" : "BDdUhYtSgftZzhzQo1DKZyK4B3GkM8WnaP0IOv9oFmcWxXXGlmeFoguLmHrVSY8/56BxH8Dpz3Lyw7cKw/SjPRM="
		}
	],
	"name" : "mining_rewards"
}

The pubKey field shows the address you can give to others such that they can send you coins. Issuing the same command in the future will retreive the same address and display your updated balance if coins are sent to (or from) the address. Also displayed in the privKey field is the AES-256 encrypted representation of the private key needed to send from the address.

Configuring mining

The easiest way to acquire coins is to mine them. Mining is the means by which new coins are created in K320 and other Proof-of-Work based cryptocurrencies. Mining also helps to secure the network by validating new transactions. Effectively you are voting with your computer’s power on the correct state of the system.

Edit the config.json file which is stored in the same location as the ckd binary with your favourite text editor. Inside that file you will need to set the miner field to true and the pubKey field to an address you generated in the earlier retrieving a wallet address section.

e.g.

...
"miner" : true,
"pubKey" : "BDdUhYtSgftZzhzQo1DKZyK4B3GkM8WnaP0IOv9oFmcWxXXGlmeFoguLmHrVSY8/56BxH8Dpz3Lyw7cKw/SjPRM=",
...

Now when you restart ckd (see the stopping ckd and running ckd sections), it will begin mining K320. Over time you will see the balance of the mining address you chose increasing though it could take several hours before you successfully mine your first coins depending on the speed of your computer and the number of other miners on the network.

Sending coins

Once you have mined some coins you can use the sendtoaddress command to send them to other K320 users. sendtoaddress takes the destination address and amount as arguments and returns the transaction ID if the send was sucessful.

e.g.

~$ ./ckd sendtoaddress BFAxMRX95crygWONzw2vxWPos8OGPdUAX9qyXvzgiapyvmQWDNY1Ao8Z5L9oDdmTS5uJ/2lqAJcftUCkqd0aBYY= 50
Please enter your wallet passphrase: ********
74770d95b789c2b7551bb62d284509e49a32eef3288c104a72409c097ce515a1

Next steps

Now that you have successfully set up a ckd instance and are on your way to mining some K320 you’re ready to explore the rest of what Cryptokernel has to offer. Check out the help command of ckd to see the full list of currently available commands or see the rest of the documentation for more advanced uses of Cryptokernel.